SCIENCE KITsch

A blog about science then, now and maybe later

Check out the Paleofuture blog and its 24-episode salute to the Jetsons that examines why their future looked like it did

I’ve been in a bunker for the last two days reading Matt Novak’s Paleofuture blog at Smithsonian.com. It not only reintroduced me to the Jetsons but to a generation of Americans thriving between WWII and the Cold War who were as enthralled with the future as many of us are. And since we’re talking about the future but we’re actually talking about theretrofuture, then we’re talking about the future and history at the same time and that’s just too cool not to link.

Well, NASA has jinxed us all…

Blogger of eccentric maps shares 1939 Map of Physics


(Source: Big Think Strange Maps by Frank Jacobs)

In addition to looking like retro apartment art, the Map of Physics plots scientists along their branches of physics and notes their major contributions. So neat.

Can you solve this? It’s called the nine dots problem, and it’s used to test access to untapped problem solving in the brain. A test group of normal (in other words, not autistic, or “Rain Man” like savant) individuals tried to solve the puzzle before brain stimualtion and no one was able to. After their brains were subjected to stimulation, 40 percent were able to solve the problem. I tried and failed because I don’t have a brain stimulation cap lying around my apartment. (Source: Wired and here’s the answer)

Can you solve this? It’s called the nine dots problem, and it’s used to test access to untapped problem solving in the brain. A test group of normal (in other words, not autistic, or “Rain Man” like savant) individuals tried to solve the puzzle before brain stimualtion and no one was able to. After their brains were subjected to stimulation, 40 percent were able to solve the problem. I tried and failed because I don’t have a brain stimulation cap lying around my apartment. (Source: Wired and here’s the answer)

One of the medieval bras found in remarkable condition in the dry conditions at Lengberg castle in Austria. (Source: BBC)

Adventures in Doggerland: Britain’s story of an underwater world the likes of Jonathan Swift never got to tell…

Doggerland’s mugshot. Good thing it’s got a great prison name.
(source: University of Exeter)

Scientists have known for years now about an underwater landmass gradually submerged by rising sea levels between 18,000 and 5,500 BC (three millenia before the construction of Stonehenge) that once connected the British Isle to mainland Europe at Denmark. However, researchers at the University of St. Andrews in collaboration with oil companies and other local universities have recently mapped the true extent of the once-inhabited land using geophysical modeling and 3D visualization the oil industry depends on for coordinating the best locations for drilling.

(Sources: UK’s The Daily Mail and The Royal Society’s Drowned Landscapes exhibit )

On a side note, surfer/photographer Chris McClean and three of his colleagues, who he refers to as the “Doggerland groms, hippies, heavies and kooks” capture modern-day Doggerland (the North Sea) in a well-written, beautifully pictured blog called The Doggerland Chronicles that not only discusses the waves but also explains some pollution issues in the North Sea.

Sheldon Cooper on the Higgs boson particle…I mean “pear-tickle.”

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